Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Series II burning oil

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Cape Charles, VA
    Posts
    5

    Default Series II burning oil

    My 1962 Series II is burning increasing amounts of oil. Blue/black smoke from the exhaust and the exhaust pipe is wet with motor oil. I have done a lot of repairs over the years on my Land Rovers, but I have never attempted any fix involving the guts of the engine (piston rods, head gaskets, etc.). Can anyone tell me what I would need to do to fix the oil lead into the combustion chamber, and whether someone with medium level mechanical skills can attempt it? I have the factory manual, but no specialty tools. Thank you for any help you can provide.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mountains of Western Pennsy.
    Posts
    509

    Default

    Well, there are three things that 'usually' cause oil burning. Valve seals, valve guides, and piston rings. Any of these repairs will require tools, some are special to each job (the basic home tool kit won't be enough). Seals can be done on the engine, guides will require a machine shop to re-do the head, and piston rings require a complete tear down of the engine. Check the spark plugs to see which cylinder has oil in it, and see how bad it is (sounds pretty bad).

    '99 Disco II
    '95 R.R.C. Lwb (Gone...)
    '76 Series III Hybrid 109
    '70 Rover 3500S

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    29

    Default

    You can do the piston rings with the engine in the truck. Not ideal, but you can do it. I did it in my driveway over a Saturday and Sunday. You'll have to drop the pan, remove the manifolds, take off the head and then do each one. It's tricky to get the bearings all back on right while working on your back, but it can be done. It's a good time to take the head and have the valves and seals done by a machine shop.

    I had low compression prior to doing mine, and was really glad I did it- I also learned a ton. The green bible has all you need.
    1976 RHD Series 3
    1940 Piper J3F-50 Cub

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Don't do anything without proper diagnosis of the issue. Take it for a compression test and a cylinder leak-down test. This will pinpoint whether the problems are in the head or the block. Head is way much easier than having to pull out the engine for machine shop work. Actually it's probably cheaper to buy a new long block than to rebuild what you have. Or go with known-good used.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Cape Charles, VA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you to everyone who has responded. As Mearstrae suggested, I checked the plugs and none of them is fouled, which is weird. To give you some background, I was mowing a field with my Series II and a tow-behind mower, using third-gear low range. In thicker vegetation, the exhaust would blow black/blue. After two hours, the exhaust pipe was slick with motor oil. But when I was testing it today, there was no obvious smoke in normal operating conditions. It does go through a lot of oil ordinarily, but I also have a leak in the front oil seal, which accounts for a share of it. I think I will take o2batsea's suggestion and take it for a compression test and cylinder leak-down test. Thanks again for all your input. Please let me know if you have other ideas.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Robert Davis is probably hoarding a few 2.25 engines in his extensive stash. He's there in Tidewater

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Cape Charles, VA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I now think the problem may be a blown head gasket. When I posted my original comment, I forgot one big thing: Two weeks ago, my engine overheated during a six-mile trip into town. Steam was billowing out of the overflow pipe on the radiator. Stupidly, I thought that I had just neglected to check radiator levels for a while, so I filled the radiator and moved on. I now suspect that I am actually loosing coolant into the combustion chamber and the residue coming out of the exhaust isn't oil at all but coolant mixed with carbon and stuff. That might also explain why my spark plugs aren't fouled. Does this sound right to you guys?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Cape Charles, VA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I have just done the compression test on my Series IIA and all the cylinders seem fine. I got readings from 130-138 psi, which I think is in the normal range. I'm still puzzling why I overheated and why the exhaust pipe was so wet. Ideas welcome.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Unparalleled product knowledge. Our mission is to support all original Land Rover models no longer supported by your local Land Rover franchise. We offer the entire range of Land Rover Genuine Parts direct from Land Rover UK, as well as publish North America's largest Land Rover publication, Rovers Magazine.
Join us