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Thread: Engine ticking and timing?

  1. #1
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    Default Engine ticking and timing?

    1963 IIA: I changed the points and condenser and reset the timing to 6 BTDC. On the test drive I noticed a ticking noise under load at 30 - 45 mph. Thinking it may be the timing, I brought it home and went to 4 BTDC and still hear the noise. Maybe it is totally unrelated to timing....maybe not. Anyone have any thoughts? It sounds like a quiet rattle snake in the firewall (but here in the Northeast, that wouldn't literally happen). Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Are you sure the valves are properly adjusted?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickinthetires View Post
    1963 IIA: I changed the points and condenser and reset the timing to 6 BTDC. On the test drive I noticed a ticking noise under load at 30 - 45 mph. Thinking it may be the timing, I brought it home and went to 4 BTDC and still hear the noise. Maybe it is totally unrelated to timing....maybe not. Anyone have any thoughts? It sounds like a quiet rattle snake in the firewall (but here in the Northeast, that wouldn't literally happen). Thanks!
    If you only hear the noise under acceleration or load - and it sounds like a quiet rattle snake AND it appeared after your changed timing... That's probably engine ping from pre-ignition (timing too advanced). Try retarding timing and see if it relieves the sound.

    If it's a persistent tic, tic, tic, tic - no matter what rpm. It's likely a valve adjustment issue or a leak in the exhaust manifold. Both can be heard and localized using a stethoscope. My engine had both issues. Took some patience to resolve but these 2.25 liter engines can run like sewing machines when adjusted and tuned correctly.
    1968 Series IIa
    1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

  4. #4
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    What degree would you suggest BTDC? Thanks.....

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickinthetires View Post
    What degree would you suggest BTDC? Thanks.....
    There are a lot of variables that would impact the answer to your question. You'll see many different recommendations where timing/advance is concerned. Land Rovers are like fiddles. Fiddles warp and curve and bend uniquely over time and you need to "learn to play your own fiddle". Land Rovers change hands, engines get re-bored, carbs change, distributors get moved to electronic ignition, fuel mixtures change (ethanol), Octane, etc, etc. There is no magic number.

    There are different timing techniques - my favorite is using a glass of liquid placed on one of the wings. With the engine running, rotate the distributor by hand clockwise and counterclockwise to find the sweet spot where the liquid in the glass is "least disturbed" - the concentric circles settle the most. Then, take the truck for a drive and see how she runs under load. If you get too much pinging, try less advance (using a timing light lets you fine tune). Then, test again, repeat.

    You're always going to get some pinging if you upshift too early or ride a high gear too long while decelerating - without downshifting. Try to test under normal conditions and, if the engine pings under a load it should be able to manage, try less advance.

    It took me a little time - trial and error - to learn. Keep adjusting and testing and measuring and learn your truck's engine. Others may chime in with timing advice - keep asking and learning :-)
    1968 Series IIa
    1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

  6. #6
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    Fantastic advice...and thanks. I will try the glass of liquid idea. I have been timing with a light, but maybe I just need to keep playing with it 1 degree at a time!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kickinthetires View Post
    Fantastic advice...and thanks. I will try the glass of liquid idea. I have been timing with a light, but maybe I just need to keep playing with it 1 degree at a time!
    Let us know how it goes. You will find, as you rotate the distributor slowly back/forth, that there is a range where the engine runs smoother. As you get to the edges of too advanced/too retarded, it will sputter and cough. It's the smooth range that you want to play within and find the happy place. It's super easy after you've done it a few times. Good/necessary skill to have as a Series owner!
    Last edited by lumpydog; 06-20-2018 at 09:28 PM.
    1968 Series IIa
    1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

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