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Thread: start (stop) button

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    13

    Default start (stop) button

    My 1991 RRC was dismantled by me down to chassis engine and running gear in order to make a Tomcat. All the wiring ended up in a large trash can. I was not sure of the engine's status so I wired a start button (with alligator clips) to the starter relay, coil and alternator. Pressed the button, the motor turned over and started OK (I had directly wired the fuel pump to the battery). I let it run for a while and realized I could not stop the engine from running without starving it of fuel.

    Stupid question: how do I wire the start button to act as a stop button once the engine is running. Is it just a matter of disconnecting the coil somehow? There must be a bunch of relays etc., in the trash can. This not really a RRC question but more of a basic wiring question. I installed this about 4 years ago and all the alligator clips are rusty. I have been working on this the last few months and just installed 2 Optima batteries in parallel as I plan to make everything switchable (fans for the rear mounted radiator, oil and transmission cooler, lights etc) independent of the (non-existent) ignition switch. I pressed the start button and the engine turned over, so the old temporary wiring is still working - I had not installed the fuel pump and tank yet so it could not start.

    I don't want to know how a lot of complicated electronic/computer things work. That is why I want to go back to the basics, pre-computer, like in the RRC of 1970. I will not reinstall the ancient FI, ABS braking system etc. No computers! The brakes have been redone from calipers to a new (US) master cylinder. I installed an Edelbrock 4-barrel. The coil is the original and the alternator and starter motor are also original, although I had them rebuilt. Does anyone else appreciated the "back to basics" approach, or am I just a Luddite?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mountains of Western Pennsy.
    Posts
    537

    Default

    You've got yourself a project and a half there. So, back to basics; if you have a dedicated 'Start' button you also need a dedicated 'Ignition' button (or switch). This allows for power to the start button and also cuts power to the ignition (coil). It needs be wired to allow the fuel pump (and everything else) to run also. A kill switch might do the trick, starting or stopping the ignition and fuel pump, by cutting or turning on all the power from the battery. It would be a good safety feature in case of a serious problem. I have a similar set-up in my S3 (also had on the Rover 3500S) since it has a 70's Range Rover drive train. V-8 with Offy manifold and Edlebrock 4bbl with Carter electric fuel pump, and electric cooling fans. I added a separate fuse block and relays for the pump and fans, as well as the lights. And...find set of Edlebrock "Off Road" needles and springs for the carb. Hope this helped, a fellow Luddite.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mearstrae View Post
    A kill switch might do the trick, starting or stopping the ignition and fuel pump, by cutting or turning on all the power from the battery. It would be a good safety feature in case of a serious problem. I added a separate fuse block and relays for the pump and fans, as well as the lights. And...find set of Edlebrock "Off Road" needles and springs for the carb. Hope this helped, a fellow Luddite.
    Thanks for the advice. Are you saying that I could add a separate kill switch/button that would cut off battery power to the coil? I assume relays are required to avoid the switch having to take the current load of the fans. Also the fuses can be in line rather than in a fuse block. I was hoping the light switches would take the current load of the lights which should be low since I will be using LED's.

    I am also considering the non-Luddite move of going TBI via a Holley system (with computer) for about $1000. This should act better for off-road use, or so I believe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mountains of Western Pennsy.
    Posts
    537

    Default

    You could use a master kill switch or a switch just for the coil, and wire in for each item needing power. A master would kill power to everything and also supply battery power direct to the fuses, relays, and switches. Believe me a central fuse and relay set-up makes trouble shooting and repair much easier. I have wired lights (and fuel pumps) without a relay by using a 20amp switch and fuse, with 14 gauge wiring. You'll still need relays for the fans and possibly fuel pump. You need to bring power (positive battery) to a central point and wire to each individual switch through the fuse block, or use the master switch to perform the same function. I havn't had any trouble off road since I installed the off road kit from Edlebrock (about $30, I think). Then you can use the $1000 for other more important things. Oh, and adding a on-off switch to the fans makes river crossings drama free (my radiator is front mounted).

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