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Thread: Starting issue - mechanical fuel pump

  1. #1

    Default Starting issue - mechanical fuel pump

    I have a 1960 SeriesII with a new mechanical fuel pump (PLC349 - from Rovers North). The engine turns over but does not start. If I spray carb cleaner into the carb (or pour in a small amount of gas) it starts but stops pretty quickly. I have a new battery, coil, plugs, wires, condensor, points and, of course, fuel pump.


    When I pump the fuel pump manually the fuel pumps through the fuel line without any problem. However, when I start the engine I don't see fuel being pumped up the line so suspect lack of fuel is the reason it is not starting. Any thoughts on what could be the issue and how to troubleshoot and fix it? Note - yesterday I removed the fuel pump and re-installed it to be sure the arm would be on top of the cam. Still no luck.

    Thanks for any insight!
    ___________________
    Dave (roversii)
    1960 Series II - "Angus"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    killingworth CT
    Posts
    742

    Default

    Some mechanicl fuel pumps were , well, less than reliable. Sadly, people report that the ability for these pumps to do what is expected, is well questionable. Folks have fitted electric fuel pumps, in line, or solitary, I have had good luck with A/C fuel pumps, mechanical. I have heard that certian TDI fuel pumps have been retrofitted for a series applicaton, , google that ,,,

  3. #3

    Default

    Strange that it would pump fuel when operated manually, but not when operated by the cam. Can you fill the carb float bowl with the manual method so the engine will run for awhile and see if the pump wakes up? If not you might take the pump off again and feel the cam to be sure no groove is worn in it and it has a normal feeling lobe. As I recall lift is only about a quarter of an inch. Maybe try operating the pump manually while off using the foot the cam pushes on, see if it pumps.

    If the pump lifts fuel up when operated manually there should not be a vacuum leak on the suction side. Nor a blockage. Is the fuel fresh enough to run the engine, not fuel that's sat for years?

    I've had lots of problems with these pumps, but only at high speed, when they wouldn't deliver enough fuel, the pressure dropped to zero, and the engine started bucking. They always would pump enough to start the engine and would deliver enough fuel to keep it running around town. Installed an electric pump in parallel that I can switch on to prevent fuel starvation on the highway.

    Keep us updated!

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erik88lr View Post
    Strange that it would pump fuel when operated manually, but not when operated by the cam. Can you fill the carb float bowl with the manual method so the engine will run for awhile and see if the pump wakes up? If not you might take the pump off again and feel the cam to be sure no groove is worn in it and it has a normal feeling lobe. As I recall lift is only about a quarter of an inch. Maybe try operating the pump manually while off using the foot the cam pushes on, see if it pumps.

    If the pump lifts fuel up when operated manually there should not be a vacuum leak on the suction side. Nor a blockage. Is the fuel fresh enough to run the engine, not fuel that's sat for years?

    I've had lots of problems with these pumps, but only at high speed, when they wouldn't deliver enough fuel, the pressure dropped to zero, and the engine started bucking. They always would pump enough to start the engine and would deliver enough fuel to keep it running around town. Installed an electric pump in parallel that I can switch on to prevent fuel starvation on the highway.

    Keep us updated!
    Thanks for the ideas! Well, I tried manually pumping and Angus started right up, ran for a bit and died. Wash, rinse, repeat - same result. For some reason the new fuel pump is not being pumped by the engine. I'll pull it and test the foot to be sure it operates the pump as you suggested. - David
    ___________________
    Dave (roversii)
    1960 Series II - "Angus"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Marblehead, MA
    Posts
    380

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    The arm on the lift pump may not be reaching the cam lobe. Is there a spacer of any sort between the pump and the block?

    If you take the new pump out compare it carefully to the one you replaced.
    1968 Series IIa
    1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by lumpydog View Post
    The arm on the lift pump may not be reaching the cam lobe. Is there a spacer of any sort between the pump and the block?

    If you take the new pump out compare it carefully to the one you replaced.
    We had this exact problem on one of our trucks. The original pump had a long arm and used a plastic or phenolic spacer between the block side location and the pump. The replacement pump had a shorter arm and it would not reach the cam without removing the spacer.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    killingworth CT
    Posts
    742

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    Quote Originally Posted by siiirhd88 View Post
    We had this exact problem on one of our trucks. The original pump had a long arm and used a plastic or phenolic spacer between the block side location and the pump. The replacement pump had a shorter arm and it would not reach the cam without removing the spacer.

    Bob
    Hmm Interesting. So are there two length arms that meet the Cam? Cedryck.

  8. #8

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    The spacer was the issue! Once I removed the spacer and reinstalled the new pump Angus started up and stayed running! Backed out the driveway and hit the brake pedal - went straight to the floor. So nice to have another project
    ___________________
    Dave (roversii)
    1960 Series II - "Angus"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    killingworth CT
    Posts
    742

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    Quote Originally Posted by roversii View Post
    The spacer was the issue! Once I removed the spacer and reinstalled the new pump Angus started up and stayed running! Backed out the driveway and hit the brake pedal - went straight to the floor. So nice to have another project
    Welcone to the world of Rovering, I had something similiar happen, I was repairing a failed distance piece on the left rear wheel, and finished the job. The truck was un-usable for about a week, when I pulled out of the garage after a week the clutch had failed, Oh the joy,,

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