Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: clutch line fix

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    79

    Default clutch line fix

    '70 SIIA, 88", 2.25 petrol, etc.

    I recently replaced my clutch master and slave cylinders. All was well and good.

    Then, as I was driving yesterday, the clutch went suddenly all the way to the floor. I assumed the seals in the slave or master had suddenly failed, but upon inspection that is not the case. Instead, I found a tiny hole in the steel clutch hydraulic line -- it appears that the steel clutch line had been rubbing against the heater line for some time and eventually had worn through. So, I have a hole in the line, passenger side of truck, near the top in a relatively accessible location.

    I'm wondering about patching or splicing the line, rather than replacing it. As you may know to replace that line (hydraulic clutch line from the clutch master to the junction on the firewall) requires removal of the hood (no biggie), driver side wing (pain in the butt), and other peripherals. And, the truck is sitting on a residential street now, not in my garage, making it more difficult to make it a big production.

    So my query is about options to mend, not replace, the line while it is still in the truck. I've never flared brake/clutch lines or the like before (though willing to learn)...and I'm (sadly) not a welder, etc. though I've worked with soldering copper etc. in the past. I guess one option would be a fix that would need to hold for 10 minutes to get the truck in gear and time enough to drive it home and get it in the driveway where I could actually replace the whole line...

    Thanks in advance for any help or ideas.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Marblehead, MA
    Posts
    381

    Default

    Couple thoughts - both focused on getting it home...

    You don't need a clutch to drive the truck... Some folks know exactly the right RPM to shift where it won't grind, even without using the clutch... Regardless, you can start in neutral and then shift 2nd with a little grind and crawl her back home.

    You could use a piece of rubber hose placed over the hole, held in place by a hose clamp. You still need to bleed the clutch to get it back in action.

    At the end of the day, don't mess with patching it as a long term fix. Do it right, do it once. Easy enough to learn how to bend and flare. Get some brake pipe at your local pep boys and practice on it.
    1968 Series IIa
    1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Thanks for the input.

    I agree with the sentiment of the long term fix, though I am/was hoping there's an equally solid fix to be had that can be achieved with the line still in the truck -- perhaps splicing in a section with the proper flares, or cutting out the small (1/4") section that's problematic and re-joining the 2 pieces (via flared connections, or whatever other means); there's enough play in the line to lose an inch or more if that's possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by lumpydog View Post
    You don't need a clutch to drive the truck... Some folks know exactly the right RPM to shift where it won't grind, even without using the clutch... Regardless, you can start in neutral and then shift 2nd with a little grind and crawl her back home.
    As for finding the right RPMs that was a no- go for me in my attempts...I could live through a little grind but it was a BIG, bone-rattling, unsettling, painful grind, and I can't subject the truck to that again...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    killingworth CT
    Posts
    823

    Default

    I would replace the line, complete, Making sure that the rubbing issue is not going to happen again. Of course when breaking into a hydro system, one must bleed system later to accomplish proper expulsion of air, and to get a good pedal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,199

    Default

    Creating a clean splice using a compression union fitting is as much or more work than just replacing the bad line.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Frankford Ontario
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by o2batsea View Post
    Creating a clean splice using a compression union fitting is as much or more work than just replacing the bad line.
    I agree. To cut out the section and flare the ends in the truck still is going to be just as much work as pulling out the entire line. Also you can start the Rover in gear, just put it in first and push the start button, it'll lurch and jump until it fires up and then you're rolling, just can't stop.
    1966 Series IIA
    A Little rough around the edges... And everywhere else.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    15

    Default

    ...re-using an older, appropriately titled post. A friend is replacing the clutch master/slave cylinders on his late Series 2A. He's thinking of keeping the likely original old hard line vs. replacing it. I'm encouraging him to replace it so the entire line is new (both soft and hard sections).

    However, my question here is, can a suitable soft line (braided stainless or?) be used to replace the few feet of 2A hard clutch line from master to slave? (forgive me purists, not looking for a debate on original vs. non-stock, just asking the question as a soft line would be much easier). Thanks
    Last edited by Elsa; 01-16-2022 at 09:13 PM.

  8. #8

    Default

    1 other option MIGHT be 2 solder a small round patch where your pipe has rubbed thru. Not cricket exactly but it could save you a lot of time. You just have 2 know how 2 solder very well & make the area VERY VERY clean B4 hand!!! (From brake fluid contamination & grease or dirt)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Niagara
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by o2batsea View Post
    Creating a clean splice using a compression union fitting is as much or more work than just replacing the bad line.
    Compression fittings are legal on a clutch line are usually easier to install in situ. Near a bend would be more difficult.

    https://www.wurthusa.com/Fluid-Power...e/p/1884056003

    New line is always best though.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Unparalleled product knowledge. Our mission is to support all original Land Rover models no longer supported by your local Land Rover franchise. We offer the entire range of Land Rover Genuine Parts direct from Land Rover UK, as well as publish North America's largest Land Rover publication, Rovers Magazine.
Join us