Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28

Thread: Terminology - Sound like you know somwthing

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mountains of Western Pennsy.
    Posts
    577

    Default

    The ILO option comes free on all British cars (by order of the Queen). Sort of a passive warning system for fluids, if you don't see the offending fluid then it's empty. More accessible than a dip stick. And not pricey like the Rover Cars "Ice Alert" system, to warn of approaching glaciers (after the Titanic, an option by Royal decree)... [This last one's real, there was an "Ice Alert" option, I have one from my '70 Rover 3500S.]

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    99

    Default

    A comment on NAS/ROW...

    After learning about the meaning, below(thanks for that), I saw a product listed as "NAS & ROW". So, that means "North American Spec" and "Rest Of World", right? So, the product description means basically "fits all", because there's nothing left. Unless you count the Mars Rovers, right?! ;p

    I think sometimes all these acronyms obfuscate the meaning more than helping to describe things.
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  3. #13

    Default

    You have to take into account that these notations originate in the UK . So ROW excludes the UK . Another older one used by Rover is NADA ( North America Dollar Area ) which includes US and Canada . It all makes sense here in the UK but I agree these acronyms are ambiguous . It is common in many industries that acronyms accepted as the norm become ambiguous or contradictory outside them. I worked for Rover & Land Rover and one had to emphasize to some employees that the Market was global , especially Land Rover , and one had not to become too parochial in ones thinking.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Ah, okay...that makes sense. I guess I didn't think it through:

    NAS/ROW means it would work in North America, and export markets, but not necessarily in the UK.

    Sorry, I didn't mean to imply the US is the center of the world .

    I think I just see alot of letters in front of parts these days more so that search engines will catch the words rather than being useful to us. I think most people would use the LR part number than trust something just fits because they bought their LR in the NADA zone.
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    99

    Wink

    "Rivet Counter" - A Land Rover restoration enthusiests who is extremely meticulous about factory correct details. This term is often a perjorative term.

    I have a question for the forum about Land Rover enthusiests. Land Rover owners...at least classic Land Rover owners...seem to fall into a couple categories. Every car culture is different, but in the last few months of owning a LR I feel like I've seen these types of owners. Do they have names, like the "Rivet Counter" above?

    What do we call this person?- Paid for a Series truck in the mid 1960's and refuses to spend another cent on it since. Replaces bolts and washers with whatever they have on the farm, often the wrong size. Uses house paint and brush to paint said Land Rover. Willing to work 20 hours to re-use a rusted piece of sheet metal that can be readily purchased for $5 new. Puts backyard gate latches on their truck's doors. Posts videos on YouTube about how clever they are that they "fixed" something on their car with big box hardware store (possibly plumbing?) parts. Do you know these guys?

    How about parts suppliers? Do they get nick-names? Here is a typical one: Has 12 products on their website, but only 5 have photos. You're just supposed to send money on faith. You order the part "next day air". They spend a week shuffling around the wherehouse in limbo with no confirmation that anything is happening. Finally, an email comes and they say they don't have your part, never had it. Also, your other parts are delayed because they don't actually have a wherehouse and the entire operation is just a PO box and a re-seller for BritPart. It turns out your missing part is also on their website from 3 other manufacturers, but no one bothered to suggest the other one sitting on the shelf right next to the one you wanted. 5 Weeks later, you finally get the part and it fits like it was made by kids in art class. You spent $90 shipping a $25 part, and don't want to spend another $50 shipping the turd back for a "refund". Do these guys have a name? Oh, yeah , LRDirect.
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    162

    Default

    well, .......... the guy who doesn't spend any thing on his rover is probably called .......RICH !!!!
    the other one who tries to make a buck by subterfuge is probably called something best left out of print!
    the first Rover owner is probably a average guy, I don't consider myself a concurs restoration specialist by any means but i do try to keep stuff like it was made ..... i don't think there is a lot of room for improvement on these rigs.
    I benifit from reading here of other avenues of parts procurement.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    99

    Default

    "Fender Flies" - these are people who appear, almost magically like flies, whenever you pop the hood of your classic car and try to fix something on it in public. They can be seen buzzing around and spontaneously telling you stories about their car adventures when you're trying to get your car back on the road.

    This might be a Socal thing. But I'm sure broken down Land Rovers draw a crowd, too.
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Another serious one...

    BSW - This stands for "British Standard Whitwortb" and its a thread standard like SAE and Metric bolts and nuts. I'm sure you Rover fans have encountered plenty of these, but it was news to a new Rover owner like me.

    BSF - This stands for "British Standard Fine" thread. I was wondering why my American hardware store didn't stock a 7/16th" -18 tpi thread chaser tap and everyone on Amazon was trying to sell me either 20 tpi or 14 tpi. Turns out the bolt was BSF, at 18. Now I know...
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  9. #19

    Default

    BSF and BSW both have Whitworth thread forms. The flank angle is 55 degrees whereas SAE ,Unified and Metric are 60 degrees . Also the root and crest of the thread is radiused whereas the Unified and Metric mail threads are flat . Another thread you may not have come across is BA ( British Association) and are numbered 0 to 12 , 12 being the smallest. 2BA is used on earlier Land Rovers for fixing the instrument panel and similar uses. cable clips, lighting etc.
    Wrenches for Whitworth nuts and bolts are marked with the thread size , not the across flats sizes .So a 1/4 BSF wrench fits a nut with a 1/4 dia thread, not one with 1/4" across the flats hexagon . The same applies to BA wrenches , a 2BA spanner fits a 2BA nut

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Seriously...I love my Series Rover, it's a classic and I get people come up to me and say they love it too. But...the fact that you have to have 3 to 4 different wrench and sockets sets to work on it is madness. What purpose can that have for a vehicle that is supposed to spend most of it's time in rough country. Lets make it more complicated and require 4 sets of sockets, spanners, wrenches, ratchets, etc. Whoever you are...you have to agree...some engineers or machinists back at Sollihul made some mistakes with that.

    Or was that a "plan"? Oh...you can't just WORK on it. You have to be a certified Land Rover mechanic...with 4 sets of each tool...real specialist $$$$. Bring it on in to the dealership! We'll take care of you!
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Unparalleled product knowledge. Our mission is to support all original Land Rover models no longer supported by your local Land Rover franchise. We offer the entire range of Land Rover Genuine Parts direct from Land Rover UK, as well as publish North America's largest Land Rover publication, Rovers Magazine.
Join us