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Thread: Trickle of fuel to carb - is this normal?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    119

    Default Trickle of fuel to carb - is this normal?

    My 1970 IIA has been stalling out/refusing to re-start when hot. I installed a shielded fuel line but that didn't solve the problem so today I added a clear fuel filter near the carburetor (Solex 36IV) to see how much fuel was getting to it. I was surprised to see that it's really a trickle. I know that's not a scientific measurement but is that normal? I didn't see much variation as the temperature rose, but I didn't want to drive it until it stalled because I'm tired of being stranded in intersections. I have an old Purolator electric pump. Could the pump be the problem?
    1970 Series IIA
    1964 Series IIA [sold]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    97

    Default

    I have a similar issue happening- runs fine until I really run it hard, then it stalls and won't start...leaving me pushing it on the road. Mine restarts after 5 minutes. Which sounds alot like a condition called vapor lock. Basically, the way Land Rover built the intake, exhaust manifold and carb setup is dumb. The carb sits on top of the hot exhaust manifold. As gasoline boils at a lower temp than water, the gas evaporates in the float bowl and leans out the mixture until it stalls. Cooling down the carb and intake/exhaust maniforlds for 5 mins gets you running again. Does that sound like your problem?

    I see in the Parts Manual some kind of heat shield some previous owner has removed. I was going to try to get this, But had other projects stealing focus. I'll be watching this thread to see if you get some results.

    PS. Another thing to check with your electric fuel pump is before buying a new one:
    1) Run it from your battery voltage into a jar to see if it runs/flows right.
    2) Make sure you don't have some voltage drop?
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vlad_d View Post
    I have a similar issue happening- runs fine until I really run it hard, then it stalls and won't start...leaving me pushing it on the road. Mine restarts after 5 minutes. .... Cooling down the carb and intake/exhaust maniforlds for 5 mins gets you running again. Does that sound like your problem? I see in the Parts Manual some kind of heat shield some previous owner has removed. I was going to try to get this, But had other projects stealing focus. I'll be watching this thread to see if you get some results.

    PS. Another thing to check with your electric fuel pump is before buying a new one:
    1) Run it from your battery voltage into a jar to see if it runs/flows right.
    2) Make sure you don't have some voltage drop?
    Yes, that sounds like my problem, except I still have the heat shield.

    p.s. great keyboard art
    1970 Series IIA
    1964 Series IIA [sold]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    chilliwack BC Canada
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IIA View Post
    My 1970 IIA has been stalling out/refusing to re-start when hot. I installed a shielded fuel line but that didn't solve the problem so today I added a clear fuel filter near the carburetor (Solex 36IV) to see how much fuel was getting to it. I was surprised to see that it's really a trickle. I know that's not a scientific measurement but is that normal? I didn't see much variation as the temperature rose, but I didn't want to drive it until it stalled because I'm tired of being stranded in intersections. I have an old Purolator electric pump. Could the pump be the problem?
    I am using the original mechanical pump albeit a new one. Yes when you look at the fuel filter it looks like an inadequate amount of fuel being pumped into it. I could spit more. I dont have your problem tho. My problem is if I dont start it up every 2nd day it wont start for lack of fuel. Have to disconnect the gas line at filter and fill the filter up and the line to the pump. I am thinking of trying an electric pump myself to see if it solves my problem.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    chilliwack BC Canada
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Is the fuel pump driven by the camshaft or does it use an auxiliary shaft to drive it. Can something inside the engine fail causing the pump to stop pumping?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    160

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    driven by cam, you can simulate this on a oem pump by pulling up on the manual operating lever on the bottom of the pump. I once made it out of the woods operating this while driving with a bit of string. also, depending on filter positioning you may not see much fuel pass through the filter as a air bubble in there may prevent it from filling all the way with fuel but again, this would depend on the positioning of the filter. you might just break the line on the discharge side of the pump and operate it manually ........ or a bottle on cranking the engine and observe the volume. I have a pump that must allow the fuel to drain back down as every few days i have to crank it a LOT to get fuel back up to the carb. probably nothing new stuff won't fix though i've had the random leaf or bs clog the exit from fuel tank ..... at random! you can also be sucking air into the system though this is easily spotted. or, the vacume relief in the cap stops relieving ........ and more etc.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IIA View Post
    My 1970 IIA has been stalling out/refusing to re-start when hot. I installed a shielded fuel line but that didn't solve the problem so today I added a clear fuel filter near the carburetor (Solex 36IV) to see how much fuel was getting to it. I was surprised to see that it's really a trickle. I know that's not a scientific measurement but is that normal? I didn't see much variation as the temperature rose, but I didn't want to drive it until it stalled because I'm tired of being stranded in intersections. I have an old Purolator electric pump. Could the pump be the problem?
    How well does it pump if you disconnect the connection to the carb & run it into a container . If it's still a a slow flow it could be a blockage in the fuel filler cap , on the pick up pipe in the tank or in the fuel line

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    chilliwack BC Canada
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Finally solved my fuel issue. The valve for switching tanks was leaking so sucking air when on the right side tank and no delivery. Bought some cork and made a new gasket and all is well.

    Name:  valve.jpg
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  9. #9

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    I had the same problem, installed an electric pump and now it starts instantly. 1960 series II Solex Carb.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    killingworth CT
    Posts
    809

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    'Im not fond of the changeover system offered by Rover, That cork gasket will easily dry out, crack, and malfunction, worse it could leak, and then you have fuel spilling onto a hot engine. I am investigating another change over switch. Tom's Bronco sent out a Ford changeover, much better valve, I will just need to get fancy about mounting, and attaching fuel lines. I would like to also fabricate a bracket that holds the valve so that I can devise a way so that it activates the Tank sensor switches like the old unit does.

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