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  1. #1
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    Wink Terminology - Sound like you know somwthing

    Hello Rovers!

    Somewhat new to Land Rover world, and I must admit that I'm scratching my head at some of the acronyms. I'm embarrassed to say I found out some of these just a few days ago. Thought I'd start a thread. Might be fun to post what we 'thought they meant along the way. It's fun to laugh at ourselves, too.

    MOD/Ex-MOD - This means "Ministry of Defense" and it means the truck was a military surplus vehicle in the UK. Some differences in design for military. - In retail context, this means "Manager on Duty". Heh. Not that. Although they are pretty "Boss"

    LWB - This means "Long Wheel Base" and it denotes the 109" or 110" models.

    SWB - This means "Short Wheel Base" and it denotes the 88" and 90" models.

    NOS - This means "New, Original Stock" and it means the part is New in the box, but it might have been sitting on a shelf since 1975. This is often the only way to get original equipment that is discontinued.

    NAS - I have no idea what this means. Is this a reference to a certain rapper? ;D Little help here?

    TDI - To the rest of the world, this means "Turbocharged Direct Injection". On VW's its often on the Diesel motors, so I kind of always assumed it meant "Turbo Diesel Injected". It's the intake for the motor. It has a turbocharger which shoves more air+fuel into the engine, and fuel injection system. Stop me if any of this is wrong. - On Land Rovers, this is a model of Defender? Does that model have a TDI setup? Should I call my Series "Series Carbeurated/Series 3c"?

    What are some acronyms that stumped you?

  2. #2
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    ...to add to the indignity, I miss spelled the Title and I can't change it. o_o

  3. #3
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    NAS, North American Spec. ROW, rest of world (spec). TDI is as you say. Series 3c isn't a thing, since all Series Land Rover had carbs. Unless you consider the Discovery Series II, a horse of a different color.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mearstrae View Post
    NAS, North American Spec. ROW, rest of world (spec). TDI is as you say. Series 3c isn't a thing, since all Series Land Rover had carbs. Unless you consider the Discovery Series II, a horse of a different color.
    What exactly makes it a "North American Spec"? Other than seat belts and the steering wheel on the left? I see NAS in front of everything. Does that mean the bolts are UNF instead of metric?

    Oh, better add:
    RHD - means "Right Hand Drive", where the steering wheel, pedals and driver are on the right side of the car.

    UNF - means "Unified Fine Thread". It's like SAE sizes of bolts (fractions of inch) but finer thread pitch. Sometimes called "machinist" threads. But basically a useless moniker, because there might be 2 or 3 different thread pitch sizes that qualify as "fine" right next to each other. I wish people referred to sizes in full name, example "5/16ths - 22 - Grade 8". Then you'd know what you're getting. But I'm going on a tangent.

  5. #5
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    NADA - What?!

  6. #6
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    NADA, kinda like NAS, North American Dealer Area. NAS is of course left hand drive (as are Dutch vehicle and some others), have all the same bolts (basiclly metric on newer LR's, and BSF and BSC (similar to UNF and UNC), or even Witworth on older LR's) etc. Pretty sure that newer NAS vehicles have different polution controls, as UK (and EUR) worry more about carbon dioxide, and here we worry about hydro-carbons. And, perhaps different safety standards. UNF= unified national fine. UNC= unified national course. You'll also find NPT referred to and that's national pipe thread. Then you've got SAE references also. Confused yet???

  7. #7
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    well, .......... the guy who doesn't spend any thing on his rover is probably called .......RICH !!!!
    the other one who tries to make a buck by subterfuge is probably called something best left out of print!
    the first Rover owner is probably a average guy, I don't consider myself a concurs restoration specialist by any means but i do try to keep stuff like it was made ..... i don't think there is a lot of room for improvement on these rigs.
    I benifit from reading here of other avenues of parts procurement.

  8. #8
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    "Fender Flies" - these are people who appear, almost magically like flies, whenever you pop the hood of your classic car and try to fix something on it in public. They can be seen buzzing around and spontaneously telling you stories about their car adventures when you're trying to get your car back on the road.

    This might be a Socal thing. But I'm sure broken down Land Rovers draw a crowd, too.
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  9. #9
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    Another serious one...

    BSW - This stands for "British Standard Whitwortb" and its a thread standard like SAE and Metric bolts and nuts. I'm sure you Rover fans have encountered plenty of these, but it was news to a new Rover owner like me.

    BSF - This stands for "British Standard Fine" thread. I was wondering why my American hardware store didn't stock a 7/16th" -18 tpi thread chaser tap and everyone on Amazon was trying to sell me either 20 tpi or 14 tpi. Turns out the bolt was BSF, at 18. Now I know...
    ...┌───────┬──,,
    ...|______OD__|__\\_____
    ...d ..__ ......... |... | ..__....p
    └/ | \────┴──┴/ | \─┘≡
    ..../..@........................@

    1973 Series 3, 109

  10. #10

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    BSF and BSW both have Whitworth thread forms. The flank angle is 55 degrees whereas SAE ,Unified and Metric are 60 degrees . Also the root and crest of the thread is radiused whereas the Unified and Metric mail threads are flat . Another thread you may not have come across is BA ( British Association) and are numbered 0 to 12 , 12 being the smallest. 2BA is used on earlier Land Rovers for fixing the instrument panel and similar uses. cable clips, lighting etc.
    Wrenches for Whitworth nuts and bolts are marked with the thread size , not the across flats sizes .So a 1/4 BSF wrench fits a nut with a 1/4 dia thread, not one with 1/4" across the flats hexagon . The same applies to BA wrenches , a 2BA spanner fits a 2BA nut

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